Reasons To Be Cheerful

As the human race we have a track record of continually evolving and improving our environment and lifestyles. Whether it’s via natural selection, competition, advances or some other driver – we adapt, we change. New technologies for example, bring efficiencies and enable behavioral shifts simplifying and making possible what once was difficult, expensive or perhaps even unobtainable. Over the past decade we could point to hundreds of examples – kinetic energy systems in vehicles or mobile devices delivering a wealth of information being just two.

Looking ahead its possible to assume an unparalleled level of change is ahead of us. This change is also delivered through ongoing innovation yet perhaps more importantly this time around fueled by the combination of:

a.) how society is evolving to expect instant access and ease of use in products and services or in short – a growing distain for complexity, and

b.) our ability through emerging social discovery channels to by-pass many of the regulations which govern us today.

Take two traditionally ‘black box’ industries, such as the medical profession and financial services. These two industries are ripe for epic change over the next decade – and that’s exciting because… it impacts all of us.

1. Medical
Have you ever been frustrated at the treatment of individual conditions, “here take this course of xyz”, as opposed to your doctor taking a more systemic and preventative approach looking at signals your body is telling you in your biomarkers and taking time to understand why your body is reacting in the way it is?

Emerging biotech companies such as Scanadu and WellnessFX will help shift the dynamic between Dr. and patient. After all we have the ability to know more about ourselves than a stranger, and in a very short time we will be empowered with the data and information to have a comprehensive two-way discussion, where you will be able to have more input into any proposed treatment.

Today companies such as WellnessFX already enable you to optimize your ‘system’ providing diagnostics and insights into the state of your health. By offering biomarker testing, a technology platform enabling you to track your progress and access to forward thinking health professionals – as a customer you are quickly empowered with information to support or challenge a diagnosis. Just last week I personally ordered several tests through a similar provider and with the results now analyzed have been able to make changes to my diet in order to assist me in reaching my body composition goal. Add the promise of Scanadu which is working towards enabling self-diagnosis via mobile device using cloud services which will also return appointment times to see you health care provider or directions to the nearest emergency room as necessary – and as the tag line states we become, “the last generation to know so little about our health.”

It’s funny to think that for years we once kept log books showing the services performed on our vehicles, yet paid less attention to our health. This will change – we’ll know much more about ourselves and have this information readily at our fingertips as opposed to being under lock and key in various medical facilities. With our new found quest to optimize our systems, eating habits will shift radically. The downstream effects should not be underestimated, stores such as Whole Foods with their established supply chains will be well positioned compared to the many restaurants and supermarkets that built their operations and profits on food with low nutritional value. Supermarket floor plans will change radically yielding more space for healthier options.

2. Financial Services
As banks continue to build distain with their customers by charging fees and increasing borrowing rates, new entrants offering ease-of-use and a fee free approach will shake up the industry. Emerging players such as Simple have this very vision.

Another driving force of change will be mobile payments. As many financial industry players scramble to offer their versions of the mobile wallet, consumer centric companies such as Google and Apple challenge with better solutions. However mobile wallets and pre-paid card solutions remain clunky (see the Kangae post, ‘One Continuous Groove’), and its only a matter of time before this step is removed altogether and replaced with a single monthly invoice – perhaps as mobile operators such as AT&T, Virgin Mobile (leveraging Virgin Finance in UK and Australia) or Vodafone for example move into the credit space with their advanced billing systems and large customer base. It wouldn’t take much to win over customers – lower rates and an innovative rewards scheme. Card providers such as American Express and Visa suddenly have new and powerful competitors capable of taking out sizable portions of their business.

3. Social Discovery
Just as online search replaced spending hours in libraries looking up reference material, Social discovery is what threatens classic search as we know it today. It should come as no surprise therefore that Social discovery is what differentiates Google+ from Facebook (see Google+ hits the social sweet spot).

Community managers are no strangers to social discovery – they have after all been working in this space for many years. They understand the immediate value in connecting people with a shared interest and expertise in a topic; not to mention the numbers which count in your favor over a traditional social network such as Facebook or LinkedIn as – you don’t know more people than you know.

Through social discovery we are already following and connecting with people who interest us. Influencing and being influenced. With the emergence of the social enterprise following the good work of salesforce.com, departmental silos are being broken down as we speak and employees are being connected – as these internal deployments mature subsequent phases will include joining partner and customer networks. You can just imagine salesforce advertising, “Salesforce.com: 10m corporate silos smashed and counting.”

The modern work environment changes considerably as customers seek out the subject matter experts (who are already establishing their personal brands). Professional communities today such as stackoverflow.com, focus.com and toolbox.com have the ability to better understand the behavior of a companies employees than the company itself. How many questions they answer, and how many people they help for example. This shift opens many possibilities for innovation and evolution of the work environment. The benefits to an organization of this type of visibility are outstanding – the ability to share the knowledge, foster discussion organization wide and also not forgetting fringe benefits such as ousting the soon to be control freaks of yesteryear who built their careers hoarding information thinking ‘knowledge is power’.

It will be interesting to see how we evolve our governments and institutions which have traditionally controlled these aspects. Will it be a case of riding the wave and in doing so prompting further evolution with new business models, revenue streams, product and services, or perhaps there will be an attempt to yield control in some way – SOPA being a great example of a wake up call to governments.

This all makes for an interesting decade ahead and one we should be excited to be part of. What makes you excited to be a citizen of earth?

Photo credit: flickr/hm11kcom

One Continuous Groove – A Solution For Mobile Payments

As American Express promotes Serve (its digital pre-paid account), Google opens its ‘Wallet’, and PayPal rolls out in-store payments – it would appear, at least for now, we’re in for a clunky ride with mobile payments. The reluctance of players to make a bold move leaves the space wide open. Ultimately the one who provides an integrated service will win and most likely cause significant disruption to the mobile and financial services industries. This could come in the form of a mobile operator, such as AT&T, offering credit lines to customers – luring them with discounted rates and a single consolidated monthly statement. Certainly this should be a threat credit card companies are considering. Perhaps a credit card company will make a pre-emptive strike for a mobile operator? Will Apple evolve the checkout experience using the iPhone 5 paired with Near Field Communication (NFC) and your iTunes account? Will Google leverage its Android platform or will Amazon offer an alternative payment method. Perhaps we’ll see the network effects of the Virgin group come into play as Mobile Virtual Network Operator (MVNO) Virgin Mobile leverages the Virgin Money division to offer a seamless experience. The point –  mobile payments are going to radically change the financial services industry forever as consumers will drive the change.

Behaviors and the value-chain
Similar to how Apple reinvented how we collect, store and play music; the opportunity exists for mobile payments to create a paradigm shift in our behavior. By removing the ‘wallet’ part from the daily ritual of wallet, keys and phone – mobile payments have the potential to replace the need to carry cash / credit cards and provide us with additional benefits such as a consolidated monthly statement. This alone cannot be overstated.

The behaviors of today will be replaced tomorrow. I experienced this first hand last year after walking into the conference room to start my weekly team meeting. A younger member of the team had just announced the fact vinyl records have a continuous groove that runs from the outside to the inside. To my surprise, there were several people in the room who found this fascinating. To people who were brought up with digital music formats it was a factoid – something they may not have even bothered to think about not ever having used or perhaps even touched vinyl.

Gone are the days of going to record stores, humming a recently heard tune to the amusement of the people who work there or thumbing through thousands of vinyl records. Now that behavior is replaced by devices such as the iPhone, apps such as Shazam and iTunes and 3G+ networks. There is an entire value chain making this possible.

Mobile device –> App –> Network provider –> Cloud service –> iTunes –> Payment provider

Apple had the device and subsequently realized a vital link in the chain was missing – the music store; so they stepped in and filled the gap with iTunes.

Good-bye wallet
It won’t be long before apps are able to replace keys – to open and start a car, to open and lock doors. (I recall many moons ago at university researching technology which recognized the unique electronic signature within our bodies and using this to open doors.) As mobile payment technology matures, credit cards and cash will become increasingly unnecessary. So the 3 touch tap to check for wallet, keys and phone, becomes the 2 touch then the one touch – phone.

Mobile payment technologies remain in their infancy however the space is super hot. However current iterations of mobile payments such as Amex Serve, Google Wallet, Starbucks and eBay’s PayPal all fall short. Why? Because an integrated service simplifies the checkout process, and offers opportunity for value-added services such as loyalty card integration and social comparisons. Ultimately my desire is to have a single bill. Linked or pre-paid accounts and the funding of them, which can take between 1-5 days, is cumbersome and unable to meet my need of now – meaning the current solutions provide little value to me.

Players in the value chain have the opportunity to create one integrated experience. What would be exciting is being able to charge items I buy against my mobile phone bill for example – and at the end of the month receive a single combined credit card / mobile phone bill.

Two peas in a pod
If you think about the basic phone services provided by a mobile network provider such as AT&T and a credit card company such as American Express they are not far off. Each month mobile network providers issue bills to their customers for services used during the period. These services are heavily transaction and usage based. A credit card company also issues a monthly statement made up of transactions during the period.

In terms of systems, telco’s have perhaps the most advanced billing capabilities – offering itemized per second / bit based on services used and the reconciliation of any time spent roaming.

If we are able to charge to a single invoice, life would be easier / more convenient. Personally I’d be happy to see payment charges showing up on my mobile phone bill. In thinking through potential mass disruptions one possibility would be for a credit card company to buy up a telco. In the United States, AT&T recently gave up on its plans to acquire Deutsche Telecom’s T-Mobile USA. Perhaps this is an opportunity for American Express to muscle in on other components of the mobile payment value chain and in doing so offer value-added services, disrupt the competition and defend against the more likely possibility of telco’s offering financial services. MVNO Virgin Mobile is well positioned here certainly in the UK, South Africa and Australia where it has banking arms already established.

As consumers we’ve proven we like convenience, consistency and value. This is why people purchase albums – we are the needle on the record, the vinyl is the internet, the groove on the record represents integrated channels and the data in the grove is the content. Simply put whoever creates this experience will dominate mobile payments.

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[Image credit: visitsteve.com]

Outbound Product Management

Wearing multiple hats is common practice in the modern organization, and no more so than in small companies. In the marketing domain this can mean outbound product management is either merged with inbound or occasionally lost all together. This post looks at a number of reason why outbound product management should be of equal if not more importance than inbound; especially when you consider the success of your product or service often depends on its penetration, adoption, and usage.

Consider these quotes from some of the leading experts in our domain:

  1. Executive Chairman of the Board at Google, Eric Schmidt (Ph.D) stated at Salesforce.com’s Dreamforce 2011 (see 0.33.47), “Apple proves if you organize around the consumer the rest will follow. And that’s something I did not understand until Google. Google runs in a similar way. Try to figure out how to solve the consumer problem and the revenue will show up.”
  2. In a July 2011 Ted Talk economics writer Tim Hartford shares the surprising link among successful complex systems – that they were built through trial and error.
  3. David Heath, Vice President of Global Sales at Nike inc. (ret.) stated in 2011, “the days of relationship selling frankly are over, and the days of bringing in the solution to the buyer and doing the buyers work for them are going to separate the winners from the losers.” See Developing Challenger Sellers – a new book from Corporate Executive Board.
  4. Marc Benioff, Chairman and CEO of Salesforce.com starts all his keynotes at customer events such as Dreamforce by thanking the attendees – the customers for making Salesforce.com what it is today.
  5. Caroline Michiels, of custom software business ThoughtWorks stated, “60% of functionality in packaged solutions is never used.”
  6. Mike Heilman, a former colleague and veteran sales leader, responded to the HBR article, “Are top salespeople born or made?” I reposted on LinkedIn stating, “I have seen people of many, many different personality types succeed in sales. I believe that the only absolutely required characteristic is empathy. You simply must be interested in other people or they will reject you. Humor and intelligence are really good as well.”

While each of these quotes are recent, they are also pulled together for this post from different sources. The context is different, yet they all have a consistent theme – listen to your customer.

What can we take away from this when bringing new products to market? Here are a few questions worth considering:

  1. Does your product or service address a customer need and also the need/s of prospective customers – i.e. market needs? Which well known need/problem is it addressing? Have you defined the opportunity upfront? Think how Google took on Microsoft Office with Google docs – significantly less functionality yet with an unmatched collaboration capability addressing a well known market need. What are the 2 key points you use to market your new product? Forget features – can you frame the issue in the mind of the customer?
  2. Have you built a business model including market share? What are the objectives? What does success look like?
  3. Are you able to synthesize what you have heard in the market, communicate this in the user stories, and ultimately simplify your product offering tailoring it to resonate with your customers?
  4. Are you confident you have provided your salesforce with the right material to enable them to target the right buyer and subsequently empathize with the buyer? Think buyer scenarios (like user scenarios but focused on the buyer – profile and pain points) and customer success stories (or testimonials) which enable the sales team to identify the right buyers, teach the customer something new about their business and take control of the sales process. This is such a critical step. If sales are unable to penetrate accounts, you risk the team dropping the new product and falling back onto others which have historically delivered (won business) for them.
  5. Have you set your new product or service up for success? Recognizing adoption is key and iterations will evolve – think Google Docs, Google Mail and more recently Google + which all launched with feedback mechanisms, and a dedicated team behind the product enabled to release iterations based on the feedback. Eric Schmidt also said at Dreamforce 11, “…you are much better off if you organize around a continuous iteration model”.
  6. How will you react to a competitive play?

Does goto market planning start before or after development in your company? Does your company separate many of the outbound product management functions into a Product Marketing function? What questions do you ask when developing your goto market strategy? Use the comment box below to share your experiences.